srijeda, 23. srpnja 2008.

Vampire bar in Kringa, Tinjan

The vampire of Kringa first appeared in text form in 1689. The Kringa vampire story evolves around a Kringa inhabitant by the name of Jure Grando (Giure Grando). For 16 years after his death and burial in Kringa Jure Grando terrorised Kringa, notably his widow ( who as legend would have it was forced to continue fulfilling her marital duties) other Kringa residents and relatives were molested. Rumour has it that the vampire of Kringa, Jure Grando , would rome the streets of Kringa at night, knocking on doors, these residents who answered would soon after die. In 1672 nine Kringa villages decided enough was enough, carrying the cross, lamps and hawthorn stick they went to the grave of Jure Grando. On opening the grave it is said that the body was intact and was lying still staring up at them. The 9 Kringa villages attempted to destroy the body. There first attempt of driving a hawthorne stake through him failed but eventually and after some exorcism prayers, the body of Jure Grando was decapitated by Stipan Milasic with a saw, the vampire screamed and blood started to flow, and soon the entire coffin was full of blood. In 1656 the vampire of Kringa died , but it was not till 1672 was decapitated as a vampire in .In the village of Kringa amongst the many stone cottages you will see large crosses erected for defence and the local bar is aptly named the vampire bar.

Sitting in a red velvet chair in the "Vampire" bar, decorated with garlic wreaths and lamps with crosses, Mladen Rajko explains how local tourist authorities launched a project last year called "Jure Grando, the Vampire from Kringa".
"No one is claiming that vampires or evil forces exist, all we want is to promote a documented legend in order to boost what we can offer tourists," says Rajko, head of the nearby municipality of Tinjan.

Visit Vampire bar in Kringa by tourning right on the road Poreč-Pazin, just before Tinjan and folow the signs.

Vampire bar Kringa

Video of dance performance in interior of Vampire Bar:

utorak, 22. srpnja 2008.

The Istrian mummies in Vodnjan

Vodnjan is a sleepy Istrian village that contains one of the region's most macabre sights. There's not much to see in the tiny town except for the Baroque 18th-century Church of St. Blaise (sveti Blaž). Pleasant enough on the outside, it's the interior that draws visitors.

Behind the main altar of lie the desiccated remains of six saints that were, in effect, mummified. The clothed bodies of St. Leon Bembo, St. Ivan John Olini, and St. Nicoloza Bursa, as well as assorted parts of three other saints, lie enclosed in glass. For unknown reasons, the bodies and body parts failed to decompose. The skin and nails darkened and dried, making the corpses look curiously wooden. In addition to the "mummies", the church reliquary contains 380 relics enclosed in glass, including the undecayed tongue of St. Mary of Egypt.

It is believed that the body of St. Nicolosa, Benedictine nun who died in Venice in 1512 is the best preserved mummy in Europe. Bioenergy healers have proved that the body of Nicolosa Bursa emits a 32-meter bioenergy circle. It is also said that there have been 50 miraculous healings in the body's close proximity.

The collection of mummies was brought to the church in Vodnjan 180 years ago, when fleeing from the perils of war it was brought from Italy by Gaetano Gresler. How these bodies, which were not embalmed, have failed to decompose and have been preserved until today (the oldest dates from the end of the 12th century) - still remains a mystery.